Types of AWS Credentials

In this post, I will talk about AWS IAM Users and Groups and AWS credentials.

The careful management of access credentials is the foundation of how you will secure your resources in the cloud. As we saw in the previous video, every interaction you make with AWS is authenticated. When you open an AWS account, the identity you begin with has access to all AWS services and resources in that account. You use this identity to establish less-privileged users and role-based access in IAM. IAM is a centralized mechanism for creating and managing individual users and their permissions with your AWS account.

An IAM group is a collection of users. Groups allow you to specify permissions for similar types of users. For example, if you have a group named “Developers,” you can give that group the types of permissions that developers typically need. This can be considered a form of role-based access control. Create groups that reflect organization roles, not technical commonality.

AWS Credentials

  • Username/Password
    • password policy is a set of rules that define the type of password an IAM user can set. You should define a password policy for all of your IAM users to enforce strong passwords and regular changing of passwords. Password requirements are similar to those found in most secure online environments. 
  • Multi-factor authentication
    • Multi-factor authentication (MFA) is an additional layer of security for accessing AWS services. With this authentication method, more than one authentication factor is checked before access is granted, which consists of a user name and password, and the single-use code from the MFA device. AWS CLI also supports MFA. Please click here for a list of supported MFA devices.
  • User Access Key
    • Users need their own access keys to make programmatic calls to AWS using the AWS CLI, the AWS SDKs, or direct HTTPS calls using the APIs for individual AWS services. Access keys are used to digitally sign API calls made to AWS services. Each access key credential is comprised of an access key ID and a secret key. Each user can have two active access keys, which is useful when you need to rotate the user’s access keys or revoke permissions.
  • Amazon EC2 key Pair

To enable SSH or RDP connections to an Amazon Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) instance, AWS uses a public–key infrastructure to sign the login request. The public and private keys are known as a key pair. To log in to your instance, you must create a key pair, or use an existing key pair, and provide the private key when you connect to the instance. You can choose to have the EC2 key pairs generated by AWS or import your own set of keys. 

EC2 key pairs do not provide accountability (as in who is using the keys); therefore, they are not recommended for routine usage. If you require daily access to the instance, AWS recommends that EC2 instances be part of a directory domain (Active Directory or LDAP) in order to enable federated access and provide accountability by tracking which user is logging into which instance.

Additional AWS Services for Identity and Access Management

  • AWS Secrets Manager is designed to centrally manage secrets used to access resources on AWS, on-premises, and third-party services. Secrets can be database credentials, passwords, third-party API keys, and even arbitrary text. Secrets Manager enables you to replace hardcoded credentials in your code with an API call to Secrets Manager to retrieve the secret programmatically. Also, you can configure Secrets Manager to automatically rotate the secret for you according to a schedule that you specify.
  • AWS Single Sign-On (SSO) is a cloud SSO service that allows for the central management of SSO access to multiple AWS accounts and business applications. It enables users to sign in to a user portal with their existing corporate credentials and access all of their assigned accounts and applications from one place. AWS SSO includes built-in SAML integrations to many business applications. AWS SSO may be integrated with Microsoft Active Directory, which means your employees can sign in to your AWS SSO user portal using their corporate Active Directory credentials. 
  • The AWS Security Token Service (STS) is a web service that enables you to request temporary, limited-privilege credentials for IAM users who are taking on a different role or for users who are being federated. A scenario in which someone, or something, needs access to your account to perform a specific task that is not done on a daily basis would be a great candidate for temporary credentials.
  • AWS Directory Service for Microsoft Active Directory, also known as AWS Managed Microsoft AD, enables your domain workloads and AWS resources to use managed Active Directory in the AWS Cloud. AWS Managed Microsoft AD is built on actual Microsoft Active Directory and does not require you to synchronize or replicate data from your existing Active Directory to the cloud.
  • AWS Organizations lets you centrally manage and enforce policies for multiple AWS accounts. This service allows grouping accounts into organizational units and use service control policies to centrally control AWS services across multiple AWS accounts. With Organizations, you can also automate the creation of new accounts through APIs and simplify billing by allowing you to set up a single payment method for all the accounts in your organization through consolidated billing. Organizations is available to all AWS customers at no additional charge.
  • Amazon Cognito lets you add user sign-up, sign-in, and access controls to your web and mobile apps. You can define roles and map users to different roles so your app can access only the resources that are authorized for each user. User sign in can be done either by a third-party identity provider, or directly via Amazon Cognito.

An Amazon Cognito user pool is a user directory that manages the overhead of handling the tokens that are returned from social sign-in providers, such as Facebook, Google, and Amazon, and enterprise identity providers via SAML 2.0. After a successful user pool sign-in, your web or mobile app will receive user pool tokens from Amazon Cognito. These tokens can then be used to retrieve AWS credentials via Amazon Cognito identity pools. These credentials allow your app to access other AWS services and you don’t have to embed long-term AWS credentials in your app.

Reference :-

Regards

Osama

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